Territorial Relocation

Moving Poncho

July 2, 2018

This past weekend, we made the decision to separate Poncho and Montana, two of Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge’s largest tiger residents. Poncho and Montana came to Turpentine together in 2016, during the Colorado Project. These beautiful boys are 8-year-old brothers that tip the scales at nearly 600 lbs each. The brothers have had their issues in the past but recently they have escalated to the point that we knew they could no longer live together.

Since Montana appeared to be the more dominant of the duo, it was decided to relocate Poncho to another habitat. We took a chance and put him next to Colby, one of our more relaxed tigers. The pair hit it off immediately, chuffing at each other and rubbing against the fence between them. Both Poncho and Colby seem to enjoy the company. They will always have a fence between them but they can spend their days chuffing and chatting. Montana also seems to be really enjoying having the habitat all to himself. He has spent his days marking everything as his and sleeping in the sunshine.

The separation of these two males is not a big surprise to the team. Wild tigers, especially males, are solo animals and very territorial. It is due to these territorial instincts that we do not introduce tigers that were not living together when they were rescued. Montana and Poncho have lived together all their lives, but as they’ve aged their instinct to claim their own territory has become stronger. We had tried to curb some of these instincts by neutering both boys but it was only a temporary fix.

Now that the pair has been separated they both appear to be happier. The boys will spend the rest of their lives living in separate habitats, but as tigers, the single life seems to be the purrfect fit for them.

Next time you visit, make sure to take a tour so you can see both boys enjoying their habitats. Montana is still located beside the office and lodging suites while Poncho and his friend Colby are on the back side of the tour loop.