Monthly Archives: November 2011

Independence Day

Independence Day Extravaganza!


Held each year on July 4th starting at 6 PM. Bring your own fireworks or buy them here. We have the perfect Ozark Mountain Top venue for the public, both tourists a locals, as a safe and legal place to shoot off you fireworks. Shoot off your fireworks in the company of others! Easy access, free parking, family event. Ends at 1 AM.

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Howl-O-Ween Spooktacular!

Howl-O-Ween Spooktacular! – Saturday, October 25th 2014


Halloween can be a hair-raising experience, especially when you throw over 100 big cats into the mix. TCWR’s annual Halloween party is the only time you can view our cats in the dark of night. The main compound is open for the whole family to experience the night habits of our lions, tigers, cougars, bobcats, and more. Games, food, and a children’s costume contest are all part of the one of a kind experience, and provides fun for all ages. The Spooktacular is the Saturday night before Halloween (Oct. 25th) from 7-9 PM.

Normal admission prices apply to event.*

$20 for adults,$15 for teenagers $10 for children 12-under, seniors, and military Children under 3 are free.

*Visitors to the Refuge during the day are allowed free entry to the party in the evening. Visitors must, however, exit the Refuge at 6:00PM, and re-enter with pass at 7:00PM

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Independence Day Extravaganza

Independence Day Extravaganza

16th Annual Independence Day Celebration Scheduled at Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge

A fun-filled family 4th of July fireworks display and family entertainment celebration

firework

Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge (TCWR) will hold it’s 16th annual Independence Day celebration Thursday, July 4, from 7:30 p.m. to midnight with an awesome fireworks display, a variety of concessions, and live entertainment featuring Gorilla Blues. The refuge requests a per-car donation which can be applied to a 2013 Family Membership pass.

“It’s hard to believe this will be our 16th year of what we call ‘organized chaos” here at the refuge. This is our most popular event every year since fireworks are not allowed within the Eureka Springs city limits,” said Tanya Smith, TCWR president and co-founder. “Our fireworks display just gets bigger each year,” added Smith

Visitors are encouraged to bring lawn chairs or blankets and may legally shoot off their own fireworks in a designated area or buy them on-site. The refuge will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. for wildlife viewing with hourly Habitat Tours from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and feeding time at 5 p.m. Refuge admission prices are $15.00 for adults and $10.00 for seniors, veterans, and children between the ages of 4-12. Children under 4 are free.

All donations appreciated and used to finance ongoing care and feeding for over 130 tigers, lions, cougars, leopards and other wildlife making TCWR a life-long home.

Howl-O-Ween

Howl-O-Ween Spooktacular! – Saturday, October 29th, 2011

Halloween can be a hair-raising experience, especially when you throw over 100 big cats into the mix. TCWR’s annual Halloween party is the only time you can view our cats in the dark of night. The main compound is open for the whole family to experience the night habits of our lions, tigers, cougars, bobcats and more. Games, food, and spooky storytelling is all part of the one of a kind experience, and provides fun for all ages. The Spooktacular is the Saturday night before Halloween (Oct. 27th) from 7-9 PM. Normal admission prices apply to event. $15 for adults, $10 for children 12-under, seniors, and military Children under 3 are free.

Big Cats Do Not Make Pets

Big Cats Do Not Make Good Pets

Turpentine Creek staff members have traveled to 17 different states rescuing big cats; lions, tigers, leopards, cougars, servals, bobcats, and lynx. Most of these precious animals would have been euthanized if not for Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge.

Frequently, young cubs of big cats are sold to people as pets; sold at auctions across the world; and sold by backyard breeders to unsuspecting buyers. A few short months pass and the new “pet owner” begins to realize they have made a mistake. They turn to newspapers, exotic trade magazines, zoos, and roadside parks to find the young cat a new home. These options don’t materialize because of the age of the exotic cat and its inability to conform to the laws of the human race.

It is in the adolescent stage of development that the cub becomes strong and aggressive. The “pet owners” usually realize that they are in trouble when someone gets hurt or threatened. They become desperate as local citizens become discontent. Authorities often get involved and, before long, the innocent animal desperately needs a new home.

For 15 years, Turpentine Creek staff members have traveled the United States saving big cats. Every animal rescue is an animal saved. Their stories chisel the following statement deep into the heart’s of the people who read them. Big Cats Do Not Make Pets.